The Simple Pleasure of Making Things

Convenience.

Here in the US and much of the western world we are living in a time in which we have never had more convenience in our lives.

Cars let us go where we want exactly when we want to, online shopping gets goods to us without us ever needing to leave the couch, and we are able to contact one another instantaneously.

However, I’ve recently come to believe that all this convenience has robbed us of a simple and classic pleasure.

The joy, satisfaction, and pride that comes with making things on your own.

For me, this realization came when I found myself in the market for a yoga mat bag. Now as an eco-minimalist I don’t want to buy anything that isn’t ethically or sustainably made and I realized an eco-friendly yoga mat bag was going to cost me quite a bit more than I hoped to spend.

I checked second hand apps for a couple days, but in all honesty I got impatient and so after those two days I was bored of the hunt and decided that the only logical choice would be to make a bag myself.

Luckily, I had an old pair of jeans I’d been saving for months in hopes of finding a way to repurpose them. I stopped wearing the jeans because the spot where my thighs rub together had gone completely threadbare so I didn’t think I could resell them. However the rest of the fabric was in great shape.

So armed with some internet tutorials and the grace of my mother being willing to remind me how a sewing machine works (and let me use hers) I got to work making my own yoga mat bag.

Now, I’ve been doing this eco-minimalism thing for about 8 months and this bag isn’t the first thing I’ve made on my own. However, it is the most elaborate and time consuming thing I’ve made myself so far. My previous DIYs have all been rather simple, just quickly combining a few store bought ingredients into a jar.

But this project was different, the only brand new material I used for this bag was the thread.  Even the sewing machine I was using had been thrifted by my mother.

What made the process truly satisfying were the moments when the tutorials didn’t have all the answers. Every pair of jeans is a little different, and I soon realized that my particular pair of pants wasn’t going to become a yoga mat bag in the same exact way as whatever pair of pants other people used.

This gave me the opportunity to creatively problem solve, and because making this bag wasn’t super easy for me I was able to feel so proud and accomplished once I finished it. I was nervous about trying to make it in the first place because I haven’t sewn in so long and have never been a highly skilled seamstress. Yet it was the challenge of my inexperience that really made the process so satisfactory.

Now let’s roll back and think about how it would have gone if I had simply shelled out the cash for an expensive and eco-friendly bag. Surely the bag would have been of great quality but I would’ve missed out on the opportunity to hone my sewing skills, be creative, and feel that satisfaction that comes only from accomplishing a task with your own two hands.

Shortly after making this yoga mat bag I also found myself in the market for some shopping bags to use at bulk bins. I initially popped onto amazon to look for the standard zero waste organic cotton or muslin cloth bags but I stopped myself. I could afford to buy the bags, but I also had a whole pile of old t shirts I was waiting to repurpose and remembered that using what’s already in your home is always the most eco-friendly option.

And thus I made my own bags again! Completely free and no worries about the carbon footprint of shipping or ethical sourcing of materials. Bonus points that all the t-shirts I repurposed were uniform shirts given to me by my employers over the years, so no initial costs for the shirts themselves either.

I often see repurposing or making things yourself recommended as an alternative for when you can’t buy the sustainable/ethically made version of an item. And I didn’t even realize that I’d taken on this mindset until after making all the bags.

So, I encourage you to try to repurpose something around your house and make it into an item you otherwise would have bought, even if you can afford the most ethical version. You may be surprised at how fun and satisfying the process is, so much so that you’ll forget about the inconvenience of having to do it yourself.

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